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NSW Get Police Presence When Violent Ex Partner Collects Belongings?

Discussion in 'Family Law Forum' started by Natalie Miller, 1 April 2015.

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  1. Natalie Miller

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    I have been in a relationship for 17 months. After five months my ex partner was arrested on weapons charges and spent five months in prison. He was released to my address for the last seven months. I discovered he was a con man with several names jobs and other women. I kicked him out two weeks ago and fear for safety as I know he has weapons hidden and now has bikie connections. Can I insist on police presence to collect his furniture?
     
  2. AllForHer

    AllForHer Well-Known Member

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    Your best bet would be to contact your local police station and request police supervision as a preventative measure. You may also wish to enquire about a domestic violence order.
     
  3. Natalie Miller

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    Thank you. What are my rights to keeping furniture? I stored mine in the garage as he wanted his in the house. Then he wanted the garage for an office for his new business which opens this week and he told me to get rid of my stuff as we have his. He also told me and my 23 yr old son he would leave the furniture for me if we split now he wants it back
     
  4. AllForHer

    AllForHer Well-Known Member

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    17 months is not quite a de facto relationship, so if a court were to make some kind of property settlement, it would probably order that each party keeps the assets they had prior to the separation. It would be a very costly legal battle, and probably not worth the cost of the furniture, or the cost of the conflict, so you're probably better off cutting ties, letting him take what is his, and moving on.
     

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