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The police are a constituted body of persons empowered by a state, with the aim to enforce the law, to ensure the safety, health and possessions of citizens, and to prevent crime and civil disorder. Their lawful powers include arrest and the use of force legitimized by the state via the monopoly on violence. The term is most commonly associated with the police forces of a sovereign state that are authorized to exercise the police power of that state within a defined legal or territorial area of responsibility. Police forces are often defined as being separate from the military and other organizations involved in the defense of the state against foreign aggressors; however, gendarmerie are military units charged with civil policing. Police forces are usually public sector services, funded through taxes.
Law enforcement is only part of policing activity. Policing has included an array of activities in different situations, but the predominant ones are concerned with the preservation of order. In some societies, in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, these developed within the context of maintaining the class system and the protection of private property. Police forces have become ubiquitous in modern societies. Nevertheless, their role can be controversial, as they are involved to varying degrees in corruption, police brutality and the enforcement of authoritarian rule.
A police force may also be referred to as a police department, police service, constabulary, gendarmerie, crime prevention, protective services, law enforcement agency, civil guard or civic guard. Members may be referred to as police officers, troopers, sheriffs, constables, rangers, peace officers or civic/civil guards. Ireland differs from other English-speaking countries by using the Irish language terms Garda (singular) and Gardaí (plural), for both the national police force and its members. The word "police" is the most universal and similar terms can be seen in many non-English speaking countries.Numerous slang terms exist for the police. Many slang terms for police officers are decades or centuries old with lost etymology. One of the oldest, "cop", has largely lost its slang connotations and become a common colloquial term used both by the public and police officers to refer to their profession.

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    NSW Police came to my house and left a note

    Hello, last week a police officer showed up to my house while i was in the shower and started knocking, I wasnt aware of who it was at the knocking ans didn't answer the door and kept showering, he went on like this for a good 5/10 minutes before giving up. Later on when i went downstairs, I...
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    NSW Police trying to subpoena home CCTV

    Police subpoened for production requesting "cctv footage of arrest at (address) on (date") . Also subpoened other family members who do not have control or posession of footage" in that footage gets deleted after period of time and only I have copy of footage. 1. How do I get other family...
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    VIC If an IVO applicant is a police officer, is the AFM statement made under oath?

    IVO served (where the applicant was a police officer) but the family member was the 'AFM- affected family member' is also a practicing lawyer. If the IVO contains provable falsities including incorrect date of births etc., is the statement by the AFM to the police officer under oath? Given...
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    NSW Police upgrading speeding offence

    Police pulled me over and stating the exchange was recorded and said "I've got you at 101km/hr" and shows me that reading on his gun. I was in a 60km/hr zone. Next thing I know rego plates have come off and he issues me with a penalty notice that says "over 45 km/hr, estimated", 6 months...
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    NSW False police reports or witness statements do not attract absolute privlede until they are produced in court. Is that correct?

    False police reports or witness statements do not attract absolute privlede until they are produced in court. Is that correct?
  6. D

    VIC How did police know ...

    So last night I think I left my phone in a taxi, but I didn’t clue onto this until the morning. I accessed “find my iPhone” and found it was most likely at the police station. Then I checked my email and found there was an email from. A Transit and Public Safety constable at 2am stating that “a...
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    VIC Lost phone then emailed by police

    So last night I think I left my phone in a taxi, but I didn’t clue onto this until the morning. I accessed “find my iPhone” and found it was most likely at the police station. Then I checked my email and found there was an email from [Redacted by Moderator - Personal Information] at 2am stating...
  8. S

    NSW Police officer family member of a victim.

    I have an ex that lied to police. This person was granted an AVO and this person sent me countless threats and threats that an AVO would ruin my family law matter. When I broke up with this person everything she threatened me with happened. I tried to see the officer in charge to show...
  9. S

    NSW Police hacked my phone.

    I was arrested and my phone was locked. I refused to unlock my phone and the police hacked into the phone despite not granting them access. Is this legal? I'm aware of Lepra 3LA but this is NSW and the judge says 3LA is commonwealth not NSW. Can someone advise if this hacking was lawful and...
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    NSW Uploading Police BWV

    If I legally obtain NSW Police Body Worn Video, through a GIPPA request. Would I then legally be allowed to publish it on YouTube/Facebook etc. As long as any private details have been redacted from the video? If I can legally publish it, next would I legally be able to earn money from the...