QLD Company Used Undergoing Liquidation - What are Debtor's Rights?

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Mooseymoo

Member
6 December 2017
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Good afternoon!

A company we used to use has gone into liquidation. We received from the liquidator some of invoices which we have been asked to pay (We were never invoiced apparently). I have no problem paying the invoices if we do owe them. I have requested proof of supply to which they have agreed, in the form of the company docket and the receipt of actually picking up the goods which show me the transaction did actually take place, so all good.

When that comes through, I will pay. The liquidators have now asked me to supply all my statements and ledger details for this company that has liquidated for 6 years. Can they actually ask for my this? They say in their email it is purely to try and work out was was supplied and paid for in this period. Can they do this?

We received statements every month and paid them in full every month. Does this mean they are searching for more outstanding debts? And if they can't supply proof of supply in the form of a driver docket and a material supply docket, what happens then? What if all they can supply is a driver docket? That doesnt show me that they picked up the goods. Seems odd they they can demand payment for invoices purely on the dockets of the liquidated company. I can't seem to find any information on debtors rights, just creditors.

Thank you.
 

Rob Legat - SBPL

Lawyer
LawTap Verified
16 February 2017
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Gold Coast, Queensland
lawtap.com
In short - yes. Liquidators have extensive powers when administering the affairs of a company. They could be searching for anything, or simply being thorough. If they find outstanding debts, they will seek payment of them. Liquidators are there to safeguard the rights of the creditors of the company. If they can get more money in, they will.

If you think a debt isn't payable, dispute it.
 
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