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WA Family and Centrelink Issues - How to Become Independent?

Discussion in 'Family Law Forum' started by Batman, 26 May 2014.

  1. Batman

    Batman Member

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    I am 16 and I have been living away from my parents for several months, they have denied me or the people I am living with any money to pay for board, school fees, my ADD medication or anything of the sort.

    I have applied to become an independent through Centrelink and I needed to fax a social worker details from a 3rd party which was agreed to be my psychologist, and the social worker was to call my parents and get their version. However, I got a letter denying me before I was even able contact my psychologist saying I was dependent and living at home, my parents are also still receiving family tax benefit for me. They have revoked my medicare so now I am unable to get another script for my ADD.

    I don't know what to do and everywhere I turn, no one can help me. My parents are known pot addicts who also mix other drugs like anti-depressants, pain killer, morphine and alcohol turning them into violent people ( domestic violence). How do I separate my self from them under family law?
     
  2. CathL

    CathL Well-Known Member

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    Hi Batman,
    Which state are you located in?
    Has your social worker been able to give you any information about this issue?
     
  3. CathL

    CathL Well-Known Member

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    For example, YouthLaw (VIC) has a fact sheet about "Becoming Independent" that says:
    If you leave home before you’re 17 and someone thinks you’re at risk of suffering significant harm, they can report the situation to the Department of Human Services (DHS).

    If DHS is concerned for your safety they can ask the Children’s Court to make an order to protect you. The court may order that you live somewhere else, like with another family or in a residential unit with other people your age. DHS is unlikely to apply to the Children’s Court for an order to protect you if you have a safe place to live and you can support yourself financially.


    You could also contact YouthLaw to talk about your situation and get some practical and legal advice.

    Here is a transcript from a while back about a 14 year old who successfully made a case to separate from his parents in the Children's Court.
     
  4. Batman

    Batman Member

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    I live in Western Australia
     

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