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QLD Can Family Court Orders be Changed?

Discussion in 'Family Law Forum' started by Sheridan, 29 July 2015.

  1. Sheridan

    Sheridan Member

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    Recently in family law court, our matter was set for hearing with me as the Respondent. The judge at that time ordered that the applicant lodge/serve their documents by a certain date. I was then given 14 days to respond.

    I waited for the Family Court Orders to appear on the Portal and eventually emailed the judge's associate. It was uploaded 7 days later and the wording in this order was VERY different to the verbal orders.

    The Family Court Orders uploaded said each party had to serve on each other at the same time. The Applicant has NEVER served me as per the court order usually giving me the documents on the morning or court or a day before. Based on the Judge's verbal orders in court and my notes made I was finally relieved that I would have the advantage of knowing the Applicants case FINALLY.

    Can Family Court Orders be changed from what was uploaded to what was actually said? I have asked the Associate to clarify but they have not responded.

    I have also ordered court transcripts.

    If there clearly is a different interpretation from the Verbal orders then who decides which orders stand?
     
  2. Sophea

    Sophea Well-Known Member

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    Hi Sheridan,

    I don't know whether it would be able to help you here, but the slip rule enables the court of its own motion or upon application by a party to correct a clerical mistake or an error arising from an accidental mistake in a judgment. The rule also extends to a correction made in order to carry into effect the actual intention of the judge.
     

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