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VIC No Family Court Orders - How to Prevent Mother-in-Law from Unsupervised Visits?

Discussion in 'Family Law Forum' started by DaveG, 10 May 2016.

  1. DaveG

    DaveG Member

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    What rights do I have?

    I have no family court orders against me and I have my son for 2 overnights a week and one additional night where I have him until I put him to bed.

    I know based on previous observation with other people the target that she is uncouth, vocal, racist and extremely disparaging with zero consideration for children or infants present. I was victim to this directly last got in front of step daughter and outside my sons bedroom loudly just after I'd put him to bed.

    My stepdaughter already treats me as her mother does but we'd been making ground which always happens but reverts back as soon as she spends any time with her Baba. I am positive she is referring to me in defamatory and derogatory terms in front of you son (2 y/o).

    My ex has indicated she'd like her Mum to be baby sitter which in light of her inability to show restraint, her cultural background that promotes hatred and racism, her demonstrated willingness to poison young minds and inflict emotional pain upon me and her husband an abusive alcoholic I want know how can I prevent them from being unsupervised in the interest of preserving and fostering a loving father-son relationship?
     
  2. CathL

    CathL Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Talk through those issues with your ex and organise consent orders where you have clear boundaries. If possible, complete a family dispute resolution session. Relationships Australia has some good information that you may find helpful. Everything must be in the best interests of the child (your personal feelings aside).
     
    N Knight likes this.

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