VIC Hit and run, didn't get license plate or details. What can be done?

Australia's #1 for Law
Join 150,000 Australians every month. Ask a question, respond to a question and better understand the law today!
FREE - Join Now

bigfella1738

Member
23 November 2019
2
0
1
Firstly, I want to clarify that this is just a hypothetical situation, this hasn't happened to me or anyone I know, I'm just doing research for a story.

If a pedestrian was hit by a car and injured badly, would there be any way at all they could follow up on the case if they didn't get the car's license plate or any of the driver's details? A hit and run, essentially. If they knew the colour and model of the car, and maybe one or two numbers of the license plate, would that get them anywhere at all?

I appreciate any insights you have!
 

Scruff

Well-Known Member
25 July 2018
818
126
2,389
NSW
That sort of thing usually results in the Police seeking information from the public. Unless someone comes forward with information solid enough to help identify the correct vehicle, it's unlikely that the case would ever be solved - you need something to link the offender to the crime.

In regard to the rego, one or two out of six digits wouldn't be enough to work with, but four or five certainly could be if you have the make and colour. Also, don't underestimate the power of modern CCTV cameras. It's certainly possible that the car was caught on a camera somewhere nearby, so again, if you have the make and colour, a modern hi-res camera could reveal enough of the rego to work with or even provide a picture of the driver.
 

Scruff

Well-Known Member
25 July 2018
818
126
2,389
NSW
Also, if we're talking about a fictional story here, then if you do reference CCTV cameras, please don't go down the Hollywood bulls**t path. Police can't just jump on a computer and have instant access to all CCTV cameras. Apparently someone forgot to tell Hollywood that the "CC" in CCTV actually means "Closed Circuit" - ie; not publicly accessible.

In Australia, we have CCTV camera registers - voluntary systems whereby the public (mostly businesses) can register the locations of their CCTV cameras with the Police. When a crime occurs, the Police can look up what cameras are in the area, then visit those locations and check the recordings to see if the cameras caught something of interest to them. There's no magic computer network.
 
Last edited:

bigfella1738

Member
23 November 2019
2
0
1
Thank you so much for your answer, it's been incredibly helpful! I definitely agree with avoiding the cliche Hollywood stuff!
 

Scruff

Well-Known Member
25 July 2018
818
126
2,389
NSW
No worries. Best of luck with the story.