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NSW Family Law - Is It Possible to Sign Over Parental Rights?

Discussion in 'Family Law Forum' started by Melanie_smith, 31 August 2015.

  1. Melanie_smith

    Melanie_smith Member

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    My partner has two children (4&7) with his previous partner. They split up over two year ago. I met him a few months later. She has given us grief over seeing the children. She has sabotaged meetings between myself and the children and is now refusing to let my partner see his kids. He called his daughter on her birthday and she told him she never wants to see or talk to him again. Now his ex has a habit of telling the children hurtful things as she can not deal with another mother figure in their lives. She asked him to sign over his rights to her after making a show on the phone that they both hate him.

    Is it possible to sign over the right to her and not pay child support under Family Law? We would like to completely walk away as that is her wish.
     
  2. AllForHer

    AllForHer Well-Known Member

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    He will still need to pay child support, whether he has parental responsibility or not.
     
  3. AllForHer

    AllForHer Well-Known Member

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    I also implore your partner to consider what's best for his children before taking the step of agreeing to orders in which he has no parental responsibility.

    These children are very young, and younger still when you entered the picture. They're hardly of an age to have developed an opinion for themselves about their dad independent of any outside influence. It's obvious the children have been compelled by their mother to hate their father, but what are they like when they're with him? Do they show the same discomfort and contempt?

    Remember, the kids in this scenario are victims, as much as the father is, and studies have consistently shown that kids are better off having one stable parent and one unstable parent than just one unstable parent. Kids with absent fathers have consistently been found more prone to depression, criminal behaviour and anxiety. They are more prone to becoming unstable adults.

    Is the father really willing to walk away and leave his children vulnerable and exposed to their mother's hate campaign, when he is really the only person his kids can depend on to protect them from it?

    I really urge him to consider legal avenues that don't involve walking away and giving in. The children need their father, whether they say it or not. Remember, they are the victims.
     

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