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NSW Australian Law - Student Officer Gave Me Bad Advice - What to Do?

Discussion in 'Other/General Law Forum' started by simon123, 20 April 2016.

  1. simon123

    simon123 Member

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    Hey, I'm going to UNSW (University of New South Wales) and was given bad advice by student centre (from my faculty). Bad advice as in telling me to pick up one wrong subject (out of 4) in this semester.

    I have, at the time before subject selecting, asked briefly for advice and on the phone mainly, but yeah, I was told to pick up a subject not counting to my degree. He (the student officer) was mistaken because this subject does not specialise in my degree, but I am. And I have proof that I was specialising through past emails.

    Anyway, they're not saying yes/no (but obviously they're going to say no we didn't). And they want evidence, and it's hard to find any records on all my phone calls because I wasn't expecting professional advice to fail me this bad. I'm in a situation where I am going to lose $1000+ for this subject and time I've been putting in it (I'm half way in the semester).

    I know the evidence would have made it easier, it's just stupid to record everything in life 24/7 as I expected to get professional advice (but now I know it helps to).

    I'm new to this law thing but do I have any rights or am I legally in a bad position as I can't provide the evidence on the advisor giving bad advice/help? Or is there a way I can work around it under Australian Law?

    Please and thanks. Much appreciated if you can help :/.
     
  2. Sophea

    Sophea Well-Known Member

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    Give them whatever you have in the way of evidence but at the end of the day you would not have chosen the subject had you not been advised to take it. Therefore, give them what you have but don't be intimidated and be firm. Give them the impression you are not going to drop it. As you have said, you don't expect to have to prove every communication with a professional because you expect that they will give you incorrect advice.
     
    simon123 likes this.
  3. simon123

    simon123 Member

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    Yes, thank you, exactly! I won't give them the impression, it's just about getting enough evidence and hope to reason with them to fix it. Thanks Sophea :)
     

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