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Witness in Court - Going on Police Check Record?

Discussion in 'Criminal Law Forum' started by Chloe2u, 2 September 2014.

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  1. Chloe2u

    Chloe2u Active Member

    23 August 2014
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    A friend of mine picked up a stolen car unbeknownst to my friend, then was caught by police. The person who actually allegedly stole car took off running and wasn't caught on scene as my friend stood there not knowing what was going on and was taken in for interview. My friend made a statement and after further investigation was exonerated and not charged. The person who allegedly stole car was charged under criminal law and is now contesting the charge. So the police needs my friend to now go to court after 2 years as a witness. My question is my friend is studying 1st year Law degree and is worried this may come back to haunt him and be on his national police check. Will going to court as witness for police be on your police check and what are the implications? Will he be OK as he is really stressed out?
  2. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

    16 July 2014
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    Hi Chloe2u,

    No, going to court as a witness and co-operating with police for an investigation over another, unrelated, party will not go on his police record. Only charged and convicted/admitted offences will go on the record. There will hardly be any ramifications regarding his future chances of admission and he will most likely not need to disclose it to the court during admission. Things such as traffic infringements or there minor offences, where charged and convicted/guilty may go on the record and will need to be disclosed. However, things such as being a witness to a case, representing someone in VCAT, being part of the jury should not affect your friend's application.

    If your friend is still worried about this, he should speak with his ethics professor at law school. They are usually quite helpful in advising such matters.

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