SA Lectures - what to note and what not

Discussion in 'Australian Law Students Forum' started by Reag, 7 June 2018.

  1. Reag

    Reag Active Member

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    If everything that is said is of importance, then wouldn't it be a good idea to write it all down (a time consuming process I know), but still better than trying to remember it all, which is unlikely?

    So, are lectures designed to give a chance for students to write everything down (unlikely), or important things (how do you know which is)? or is it assumed that students will bring along their tape recorders?

    Who use to bring a tape recorder to lectures (before they were made digital), and how would you fair in your past studies had they been prohibited ?
     
  2. Rod

    Rod Well-Known Member
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    One of the arts of study is to identify the important bits. The rest is filler designed to aid in comprehension of the important bits.

    Essential: write the principle, its elements and authority for the principle. Then record other authorities that are a variation on the main principle with why they are important.

    Then add other stuff that helps you remember the principle and the elements.

    All my lectures are recorded and available online. Great IT system to facilitate learning. I still have access to material from 1st year.
     
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  3. DMLegal

    DMLegal Well-Known Member

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    When I studied law the only way lectures made sense was if I had done the pre-readings. Without those it all seemed important, however in light of the readings it was clear what the lecturer added (the important stuff) and what was in the textbook. On average I took less than half a page of notes in a lecture. In saying that, what works for one person may not for the next, so go with what works for you I reckon. If you find you are not taking much in frantically writing everything down, the don't and see what happens. Do the readings though, they help.
     
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  4. scott roberts

    scott roberts Member

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    I never take notes.

    I discover notes are useful for learning specifics, yet terrible for picking up a decent comprehension - which is the thing that you ought to make progress toward. Taking notes influences you to centre around the specifics and semantics of what the educator is stating. Simply tuning in to the educator encourages you to recollect the significance of what they are instructing; the majority of the pointless subtle elements dissolve away, and you are left with an essential comprehension. There's no such thing as multitasking; your mind can extremely just process one thing at any given moment. On account of class, your cerebrum is working just on either deciphering or interpreting. I observe meaning be considerably more powerful.

    For instance, a teacher strolls through a math issue on the board. You could either take after a long and compose what they composed verbatim, trusting that you will have the capacity to interpret and comprehend it later as you ponder for your last, or you can tune in to the teacher and attempt to comprehend what they are doing as they are doing it - no compelling reason to consider it later.
    weed lawyer
     
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