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QLD What to Do About Neighbour's Harassment?

Discussion in 'Criminal Law Forum' started by 84077, 12 November 2015.

  1. 84077

    84077 Member

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    Our neighbour is know in the community to cause issues with complaints and law suits thrown in every direction at individuals, council and businesses. We are constantly living as though oppressed, be it a noise from our dog, music playing or the children playing.

    Now I have avoided confrontation and I have not complained about their late night parties or dog barking through the nights of their absence, etc. But again I have the threat of some action against me, on an issue that is not an issue with anyone else but them (checked with police).

    It used to be an amusing matter hearing the neighbour make regular phone calls to businesses with complaints and threats of legal action, but the personal attacks over the last few years has left me anxious in my own home shortening ,my temper with the dog, the kids and just generally making life harder.

    The individual waits until I left for work and then harasses my partner, but she is quite timid and the neighbour prefers now to harass me.

    Is there any action I or the affected community could take against the person's harassment?

    It wouldn't be hard to get several local businesses and individuals to back me, also the council would have record of the multitude of complaints. If I could get those maybe through freedom to information?

    Thanks
     
  2. Sophea

    Sophea Well-Known Member

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    Depending on all the circumstance you may have a legal action such as nuisance available to you. You would need to prove that the neighbour's actions hinder your right to enjoy the use of both private and public property, which is affecting a number of residents in the area. There are a variety of actions that may constitute nuisance such as damaging air quality or noise pollution as defined by the Environmental protection act.

    Your legal options really depend on the precise circumstances so you are best off seeking personalised advice from a lawyer perhaps as a collective community group.
     

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