SA Unfair treatment for leaves

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kosh ss

Member
26 September 2019
2
0
1
Hi all,

A bit of a long post, but required to provide you with context:
A few weeks ago, I approached my manager to request for 3 months unpaid leave to complete a few courses(not related to my job role). My manager reviewed the company leave policy, spoke to higher level management and our P&C dept to sort this out for me. I was then informed that my company policy for unpaid leave requires for me to have worked at the company for at least 3 years. There will be no exceptions made to this rule as this could set a precedent for other people to request leave before they complete 3 years with the company. I tried to negotiate the leaves again and was declined with the same reason. Also my company was going through a restructure at that time and my manager said an unpaid leave would not be an option. I was also advised that quitting my job was still an option for me.

Now, I joined this company 2 years ago on the same day as another colleague. We were recruited for the same position are still employed in the same roles; our performance is on par with each other. She has recently told me that she has requested for unpaid leave to begin next month for 4 months which was approved. Her reasons were different than mine.

Q1) Considering that both our tenure with the company is the same, would this be considered unfair treatment?

Q2) I have even considered quitting my job as I feel I need to pursue the course. Listening to my colleague tell me that her leave has been approved has not helped my cause. Would it be better for me to initiate action against my employer now or could I quit my job and still do this?

Thanks for reading and any helpful inputs :)
 

Scruff

Well-Known Member
25 July 2018
818
126
2,389
NSW
I think that the company may be viewing this as you trying to gain qualifications so you can leave and pursue other career options. If that's the case, then the company is under no obligation to help you do that. If the courses would assist you in your existing position or to advance within the company, then that would be a different story.

In these circumstances, I don't think that decisions relating to other employees is relevant.

I would look into doing the courses in your own time (night classes or by correspondence if available).
 
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kosh ss

Member
26 September 2019
2
0
1
I think that the company may be viewing this as you trying to gain qualifications so you can leave and pursue other career options. If that's the case, then the company is under no obligation to help you do that. If the courses would assist you in your existing position or to advance within the company, then that would be a different story.

In these circumstances, I don't think that decisions relating to other employees is relevant.

I would look into doing the courses in your own time (night classes or by correspondence if available).
makes a lot of sense... thank you :)