SA Stolen vehicle-change registered owner

Discussion in 'Property Law Forum' started by AnEnigma, 11 October 2018.

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  1. AnEnigma

    AnEnigma Member

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    I know this is probably a very silly question & the answer will most likely be the most obvious one...

    Basically, long story short, a so-called "friend" asked to borrow a car that I had up for sale because his car broke down.

    After a couple of days he offered to buy the car, which was fine but almost 3 months later he has not made any attempt to pay, he refuses to return the vehicle & I haven't even heard from him in over a month. Apparently he can't come up with an intelligent reply on his own, so he waits until he is with his Dad to respond. And even then, his responses are still lacking any glimmer of intelligence.

    The car had just been registered for 3 months when he borrowed it & now that it is almost expired, I'm worried his plan is to walk into motor reg the day after it expires & change ownership.

    I had no intention of getting the police involved but it's either report it stolen or just let the @$$hole have it.
    He's a spoilt brat who believes he is entitled to just take whatever he wants & the entire world owes him. I'm not going to encourage that "poor victim" mentally by handing over my car.

    So if I report it stolen, can he register it under his name after the registeration has expired?

    (If anyone is wondering why I haven't just gone over to his house & demanded it back, it's because I'm a 5'2 female & his missus is twice my size. I prefer my body to be intact)
     
  2. Rod

    Rod Well-Known Member
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    In theory, no. I say in theory because mistakes can happen. Vehicles are registered with a VIN so the plates do not matter.

    You should report it stolen to the police and see if they will recover it for you. Sometimes that works.

    Sometimes the police will take the report and then say it is a civil matter. If that happens, get a print of the report, hire two beefy personal security guards for 2-3 hrs, write a letter to the security firm authorising them to collect the car on your behalf, have them knock and the door and handle the 'negotiations' while you wait in the car.
     
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  3. Rob Legat - SBPL

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    I'd suggest along the same lines as Rod, but not to use security guards. Find a licensed commercial agent - or better yet, one who also happens to be a local court bailiff. They know the ins and outs of repossession better than most. It may cost you a few dollars. If you have a set of the keys, you may be able to avoid having it towed (which adds expense).
     
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