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VIC Australian Consumer Law - Should Retailer Honour Trampoline Price?

Discussion in 'Australian Consumer Law Forum' started by Bob_J, 12 February 2016.

  1. Bob_J

    Bob_J Member

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    Hi all,

    I recently purchased a new trampoline. Good price, free delivery, paid for in full ( credit card) with receipt. The retailer just called up and told me that the price they sold it to me for is wrong and they will sell me the trampoline for 'wholesale' at $820. (sticker price was $999, price I paid was $700).

    Given that I have a receipt and have paid in full, do they have to honour the price they sold it to me for under Australian Consumer Law?

    Cheers
     
  2. Sophea

    Sophea Well-Known Member

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    Did you receive the trampoline yet? Was the transaction finalised?
     
  3. Bob_J

    Bob_J Member

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    Hi Sophea,

    Haven't received the trampoline. Shop owner will only refund or wants me to pay more to get the trampoline.

    Cheers
     
  4. Sophea

    Sophea Well-Known Member

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    I know it seems a little unfair, but where it is a genuine pricing mistake and not an attempt to mislead people to make them buy the trampoline and then agree to pay a higher price, you generally don't have a right to enforce the sale. Considering that they are offering for you to purchase it at wholesale price, then it would appear it is a genuine mistake and not an orchestrated ploy to mislead.

    Check out the retailers terms and conditions of sale on their website. Some retailers such as supermarkets specify that an incorrectly priced item must be sold at the advertised price if it is lower than the actual price. If so, you can enforce this policy. However if not, you may have to let the trampoline go, or pay the wholesale price as offered.

    Check this article out: Australian Consumer Law Rights – Incorrect Pricing - Legal Blog - LawAnswers.com.au
     

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