court

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A court is any person or institution, often as a government institution, with the authority to adjudicate legal disputes between parties and carry out the administration of justice in civil, criminal, and administrative matters in accordance with the rule of law. In both common law and civil law legal systems, courts are the central means for dispute resolution, and it is generally understood that all people have an ability to bring their claims before a court. Similarly, the rights of those accused of a crime include the right to present a defense before a court.
The system of courts that interprets and applies the law is collectively known as the judiciary. The place where a court sits is known as a venue. The room where court proceedings occur is known as a courtroom, and the building as a courthouse; court facilities range from simple and very small facilities in rural communities to large buildings in cities.
The practical authority given to the court is known as its jurisdiction (Latin: jus dicere') – the court's power to decide certain kinds of questions or petitions put to it. According to William Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England, a court is constituted by a minimum of three parties: the actor or plaintiff, who complains of an injury done; the reus or defendant, who is called upon to make satisfaction for it, and the judex or judicial power, which is to examine the truth of the fact, to determine the law arising upon that fact, and, if any injury appears to have been done, to ascertain and by its officers to apply a legal remedy. It is also usual in the superior courts to have barristers, and attorneys or counsel, as assistants, though, often, courts consist of additional barristers, bailiffs, reporters, and perhaps a jury.
The term "the court" is also used to refer to the presiding officer or officials, usually one or more judges. The judge or panel of judges may also be collectively referred to as "the bench" (in contrast to attorneys and barristers, collectively referred to as "the bar"). In the United States, and other common law jurisdictions, the term "court" (in the case of U.S. federal courts) by law is used to describe the judge himself or herself.In the United States, the legal authority of a court to take action is based on personal jurisdiction over the parties to the litigation and subject-matter jurisdiction over the claims asserted.

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  1. kimbapuppy

    VIC Parental Alienation family court cases to be able to quote in my trial

    Are there any parental alienation family law cases in Australia that I can quote in my trial? I am the alienated parent. My kids echo the negative views of the mother, won't eat the food I cook them, never says any positive things about the father. One of the child has eating anxiety (lost a...
  2. F

    NSW Affidavit and other court paperwork

    How far out from the court date can affidavit, interim orders, a notice of risk, final orders etc be submitted to the court? Would this affect the outcome at court that the paperwork has been left until the last minute?
  3. O

    NSW Income tax payable on receipt of income protection lump sum payment?

    I have been advised that income tax is payable on an income protection insurance lump sum payment (-legal costs) in the year it is received. Does whether the lump sum was negotiated prior to Court or decided at Court have any bearing how the ATO views the lump sum payment? ie as income in that...
  4. J

    NSW False police reports or witness statements do not attract absolute privlede until they are produced in court. Is that correct?

    False police reports or witness statements do not attract absolute privlede until they are produced in court. Is that correct?
  5. T

    NSW Are civil claims, affidavits, court statements etc exempt from non disparagement contract terms?

    Are civil claims, affidavits, court statements etc exempt from non disparagement contract terms?
  6. J

    NSW Is a court attendance notice (CAN) the same as a summons?

    Is a court attendance notice (CAN) the same as a summons? If no, what are the differences?
  7. J

    NSW What legislation covers the service of Court Attendance Notices??

    What legislation covers the service of Court Attendance Notices in NSW? It is breach avo proceedings in local court (summary).
  8. mjpSydDad

    NSW School holiday/ Christmas court parenting order confusion

    The existing orders were drafted by wife's lawyers, and state that: Child A lives with both parents on a 7 day, week about basis "That Child A spend time with the Father for one half of all school holiday periods, being the first half in even numbered years and in alternate years...
  9. D

    VIC changing conditions on an ivo

    my partner has an ivo against me but did not want me to stop seeing her or contacting her, she is not well as she is battling a terminal illness and can not go to court to change this is there another way at all because so far i have been charged wuth 5 breaches and spent 3 nights in jail just...
  10. M

    NSW Recalcitrant husband and court bias

    Hi all, I have been in a property settlement dispute in the Family Court since 2016. My (still) husband has repeatedly over this time not disclosed his assets. As of last Tuesday he has flouted court orders, filed an Undertaking (in which he has lied), responded to matters past their deadline...