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VIC Moving Interstate - What to Do About Summons?

Discussion in 'Criminal Law Forum' started by broomie21, 18 January 2016.

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  1. broomie21

    broomie21 Well-Known Member

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    Hi everyone,

    I am planning on moving from Vic to Qld to look after my sick mother. I have been told by the police that I may be charged on summons with an employment related matter but there is no firm answer as yet. The police have told me that it's up to the senior sergeant to make a decision as to whether I'm charged or the matter whether it is dropped.

    I want to move in the next few weeks but the police have said this could take months. They said that if I go, then they can hold the case without me being there.

    I don't want to go if this is going to hinder my chances at a fair hearing.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Kind regards
     
  2. Ponala

    Ponala Well-Known Member

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    What are you asking?

    If it is a summary matter, then it can be heard in your absence, if indictable, then you need to be at court.

    If you move interstate and the police don't have your address then they could issue a warrant for your arrest. Unless the matters are very serious, they would not seek to have you arrested and extradited.
     
  3. Tim W

    Tim W Lawyer

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    If there are no proceedings officially started,
    and no papers issued of any kind,
    and no other factors such as (but not only) bail conditions in play,
    then you are free to come and go as you please.
     
  4. Tim W

    Tim W Lawyer

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    Of course, if you choose to defend the matter,
    then you will need to be in court.
     

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