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QLD Family Law - Is Ex Exposing Child to Adult Content?

Discussion in 'Family Law Forum' started by CSollomon, 30 May 2016.

  1. CSollomon

    CSollomon Member

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    My ex-wife has downloaded an app on my 9-year-old daughter's ipad that I have recently discovered is a 12+ App but further into the terms of use, it strictly specifies that all users must be over the age of 18.
    The reason I went looking into the app further is because I discovered very inappropriate language and themes (High sexual references and strong coarse language).

    After that discovery, I found that you can quite easily locate pornographic videos and photos very easily. I have addressed these concerns with her but she is adamant that she will continue to allow my daughter access to this application.

    Legally under family law, is she allowed to do this? Is she not willfully exposing our child to pornographic content?

    Any help is much appreciated.

    Thank you.
     
  2. AllForHer

    AllForHer Well-Known Member

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    All iPads automatically come with the Safari web browser, which is an app that cannot be deleted. It's very easy to search for R-rated material on Safari. Would you expect the Court to hold all parents responsible for that risk?
     
  3. CSollomon

    CSollomon Member

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    Very aware of that, and you can quite easily block access to age sensitive material on safari. My concern is that most of the material on this particular app. is unsuitable for 9 year olds, where as in comparison to an app like safari there are endless things on there that are perfectly safe for them to see.

    Ill also mention that the app says it is a 12+ app and then further goes to say it should not be used by anyone under the age of 18.
    There is no terms and conditions of this kind in the safari app.

    My question is, is there anything that can be done?
     
  4. AllForHer

    AllForHer Well-Known Member

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    No.

    The Court recognises two forms of decision-making.
    1. Major, long-term decisions, such as education, major medical interventions, care arrangements and changes to name; and
    2. Day-to-day decisions, such as what the child wears, what they watch on television, and what they eat for breakfast.
    The first is governed by shared parental responsibility, which means you do have a say about it.

    The second is governed by the parent with whom the child is spending time, which means you don't have a say about it unless the child is in your care.

    The Court doesn't decide on day-to-day decisions, only on major long-term decisions. It doesn't have the resources to hear every little disagreement that separated parents encounter, and nor will it control the actions of one as a result of the will of the other.

    What the child watches or does on an iPad when with the other parent is a day-to-day decision to be made by that other parent. As such, the Court will not intervene.
     

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