NSW a vet overdosed my horse this made him sick became toxic had to be pts can I sue vet negligence?

Discussion in 'Other/General Law Forum' started by Deleis Watson, 14 June 2018.

  1. Deleis Watson

    Deleis Watson Active Member

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    vet overdose my horse causing death can I sue negligence?
     
  2. Clancy

    Clancy Well-Known Member

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    Is the Vet admitting the accidental overdose? Then yes, his insurance should compensate you.
     
  3. Deleis Watson

    Deleis Watson Active Member

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    well I don't think they will omitted to doing it but how else and who else had access to the drug and who else administrated it it's documented on the bill they gave me that I owe for them trying to save his life while it was there fault and negligence that gave me the bill in the first place
     
  4. Clancy

    Clancy Well-Known Member

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    Are you saying they have billed you for medical action taken which was in response to their overdose?
     
  5. Deleis Watson

    Deleis Watson Active Member

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    yes 25000 and I lost my boy I'm heart broken to the point I wish I could have gone with him since that day August 22nd 2017 every night I go to sleep I hope I never wake up and when I do it is another day of living a nightmare it'd not about the bill but what if this idiot dose this again to another poor innocent animal cause she just giggles like it is a joke she don't care
     
  6. Clancy

    Clancy Well-Known Member

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    Sorry for your heartbreak...... But try not to let emotions cloud your judgement with regard to what legal action you want to take.

    Perhaps there is a veterinary association you can talk too about your case before deciding to take legal action?
     
  7. Deleis Watson

    Deleis Watson Active Member

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  8. Deleis Watson

    Deleis Watson Active Member

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    well I was hoping you could direct me in the right directionwith That do you think maybe I have any kind of case here could I get her vet licence removed for negligence would there be any chance of during for loss pain and suffering due to her mistakes a mistake that should never happened he fort so hard to live he didn't want to die he was a beautiful horse who lived life I want some kind of justice for him and yet be made accountable for her neglelegence do you think I have grounds or would I get thrown out court
     
  9. Clancy

    Clancy Well-Known Member

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    Well, in order to understand if you have grounds, this is why i suggested talking to a veterinary association, or even other individual vets. You need to fully understand what was done and why it was done and was anything done contrary to being within the realm of plausible veterinary procedure? Which basically means the difference between a mistake? or a poor choice but still within the realm of plausible veterinary procedure?
     
  10. Rob Legat - SBPL

    LawTap Verified Lawyer

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    This is by no means my area of law, and I don't even profess to know a lot about horses.

    My understanding is that a lot of animals, including horses, can and do die during veterinary treatment where there is no lack of care or negligence. You would need to prove that your horse's death was due to a breach of the vet's duty of care - not just that the horse died because of their treatment. In other words, if the vet acted reasonably in the circumstances given the requisite degree of knowledge and understanding then it's unlikely that they're legally responsible for the death.

    I would suggest that the first course of action would be to get an independent review of the matter by a qualified equestrian vet who can give you an objective report on what happened. This may, if possible, require an autopsy.
     
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